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The mystery of the Battenberg cake

The Mystery of Three Quarters Book Cover The Mystery of Three Quarters
Hercule Poirot (New)
Sophie Hannah, Agatha Christie,
Poirot, detective, suspense, mystery
HarperCollins
August 20, 2018
400

The world's most beloved detective, Hercule Poirot - the legendary star of Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express and most recently The Monogram Murders and Closed Casket--returns in a stylish, diabolically clever mystery set in 1930's London. Returning home after lunch one day, Hercule Poirot finds an angry woman waiting outside his front door. She demands to know why Poirot has sent her a letter accusing her of the murder of Barnabas Pandy, a man she has neither heard of nor ever met. Poirot has also never heard of a Barnabas Pandy, and has accused nobody of murder. Shaken, he goes inside, only to find that he has a visitor waiting for him -- a man who also claims also to have received a letter from Poirot that morning, accusing him of the murder of Barnabas Pandy... Poirot wonders how many more letters of this sort have been sent in his name. Who sent them, and why? More importantly, who is Barnabas Pandy, is he dead, and, if so, was he murdered? And can Poirot find out the answers without putting more lives in danger?

The opening chapters of this book are so vivid that in my ind’s eye I see it happening.

I see David Suchet bustling and hear him deliver the words. I see his very special walk – such a distinctive gait – and take off his hat and coat.

It is perhaps because i have seen Suchet’s TV performance portrayal so often that he comes to mind, but still my imagination visualises him throughout the story as the character of Hercule Poirot. The mannerisms he used are mentioned in the story and sonthe echoes remain.

I cannot say the same of the chapters ‘written’ by the detective. He slips back into the background even though he is half the book.

I found the story very entertaining – better in my mind than the original stories even though they are intended to ‘copy’ her style. More amusing and more accessible. I still didn’t get the answer though – as just in the original Christie books there are masses of red herrings to mislead you!

Oh and the Windowpane cake is really a Battenberg so a very well known recipe, so little chance of it being stolen.

I suspect that without David Suchet the story would not have been so appealing but as he is one of my favourite actors…

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