What Trouble? The Author Speaks

Nothing But Trouble Book Cover Nothing But Trouble
Irresistible Billionaires #1
Ashley Bostock
contemporary fiction, romance, Adult,

Billionaire CEO Michael Vilander needed just one date. Creating a fake profile on his own matchmaking website may not have been his brightest move. But then Sophia Baldwin’s arresting face pops up on his CHAT NOW feature. Not only is she gorgeous, but after spending half the night exchanging messages with her, he finds her to be naive, innocent and way too sexy.

Twenty-four-year-old Sophia Baldwin is barely able to make ends meet. Caring for her sick grandmother prevents her from having a normal life—aspirations of attending college full-time to become a nurse are on the back burner—but then she meets the charming and dazzling Clint on an online dating site. When he asks her to the Denver Arts Foundation’s Annual Valentine’s Day Gala, she’s confident things are looking up.

Once Sophia learns that her hot date is none other than website mogul Michael Vilander, she’s definitely not mentioning her night job. What’s a lie by omission anyway? After all, it’s only one date…Until Michael’s ex flaunts her fancy engagement ring in Michael’s face and something compels Sophia to announce her and Michael’s engagement. AKA, fake engagement. They agree on one month to pretend they’re in love before all bets are off.

Pretending to be in love with a sweet and sexy billionaire, but not actually falling in love, ahem, how hard could it be?

An Interview with Ashley 

Author Bio:

Ashley Bostock is a Colorado Native and currently lives in Nebraska, with daydreams of moving back home. All her books feature sexy-as-hell heroes and strong heroines. She loves reading any chance she gets – Jill Shalvis, M. O’Keefe, Rachel Gibson, Karen Robards and Jennifer Probst are some of her favorites! Ashley loves traveling – in a wanderlust’s eyes, she’s hardly touched the world but to those that rarely travel, she’s been everywhere. Thailand, Cambodia, Japan, Turks & Caicos, Russia, China, Tahiti, Vietnam and Scotland, just to name a few.

Ashley is addicted to Instagram – if you want to follow her there: www.instagram.com/ashleybostock

If you want to stay in the know about new releases and receive EXCLUSIVE content, sign up for Ashley’s newsletter at this address: https://www.subscribepage.com/ashleybostock

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  1. How long do you think about a topic before deciding to write about it? Do you have a set of notes or a note book where you write down topics that appeal before making a decision as to which topic this time?

Well, depends. If I get an idea for a book or series but am currently writing a different book or I’m mid-series with something else, I take notes and write things down to go back to at a later date. The second I find a series or book to write, it sort of makes the decision for me as I’m writing book one. Like whether or not there is going to be a book three or book five. I think about what tropes I would like to see in the books. I enjoy friends-to-lovers and enemies to lovers as well as fake relationships turned real. This is if I’m mid-series. If I’m not, then I write whatever my heart is telling me to write. That could be notes I’ve taken previously, stories that I’ve maybe written the first ten pages of, or it could be a completely new idea that I have no notes for! I use a notebook to keep ideas in and note cards for scenes/plotting while I’m writing.

  1. Does writing provide sufficient income to live on? And how long did it take before this happened?

Not for me it hasn’t yet. It’s a slow process that takes a lot of work and dedication. It only happens overnight for very few people! Check back with me about how long it takes – I’m currently on my fourth year of self-publishing.

 3. What do you read when you are ill in bed?

I enjoy reading romance novels. Authors from the Avon line are usually my favorite: Jill Shalvis, Sophie Jordan, Lori Wilde and Rachel Gibson. I also enjoy reading romantic suspense – Karen Robards and Tess Gerritsen.

  1. What is your favourite genre?

Contemporary Romance, Erotic Romance as well as Romantic Suspense. Those are my top three.

 

  1. Have you ever tried to imitate another author’s style? And if so, why?

Again, going back to the Avon line, I think my writing is influenced by those authors. However, I do like my sex scenes a little more explicit and spicier. I love the way those authors write. I just read Sophie Jordan’s Beautiful Lawman and I couldn’t put it down. I read it in a day. I strive to accomplish that for my readers.

 

  1. What have you done with the things you wrote when in school?

I still have the things I wrote from high school. A lot of poems and some short stories as well as class assignments that I’ve kept.

 

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Make those skills work for you

HOT PURSUIT. Book Cover HOT PURSUIT.
REBECCA. FREEBORN
contemporary fiction, romance, humour, mystery
Pantera Press
(28 Mar. 2018)

A missing rockstar, a suspected murderer on the run, and a chase through some of the world’s most romantic destinations

Sarah Burrowes is left with a shattered heart and a huge mortgage after the love of her life abruptly runs out on her.

An aspiring journalist, Sarah spends her days slaving away at a gossip magazine—far from her dream job.

Heartbroken and fed up, Sarah decides to take her career by the reins and lands herself the assignment of a lifetime in Europe. But there’s a catch—her boss pairs her with gorgeous but egocentric photographer, Nick, who just happens to be her ex’s best friend.

But when Sarah’s assignment takes a darker turn, she discovers there’s more to this story than meets the eye. Is she ready to risk everything to get the scoop?

A kick-ass heroine here in a really nicely written fun story. So our heroine is exiting – still – a bad relationship with a not so good guy, when she finds herself travelling for her work – being a journalist.

Except that her boss doesn’t really think she is suited to the job as her previous career experience (despite her degree) had been in beauty therapy ie hair-dressing, and that was her current writing slot at the mag.

She gets sent abroad to investigate with a really hot camera man and things take the usual course. But are complicated by the rock star she manages to befriend and various shady activities. Nothing goes right, but works out well in the end.

Based in Australia, it makes a nice change of dialect for me, and brings back memories of my visit there too.

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And could you foster?

The Girl Who Wanted to Belong Book Cover The Girl Who Wanted to Belong
Angela Hart
Angela Hart
families, parents, fostering, child abuse
Bluebird
August 23, 2018
336

The fifth book in the series by foster mum and Sunday Times bestselling author Angela Hart who, along with her husband Jonathan, has fostered more than fifty children.

Lucy is eight years old and ends up in foster care after being abandoned by her mum and kicked out by her new stepmother.

Two aunties and then her elderly grandmother take her in but it seems nobody can cope with Lucy's disruptive behaviour.

Social Services hope a stay with experienced foster carer Angela will help Lucy settle down. She misses her dad and three siblings and is desperate for a fresh start back home, but will Lucy ever be able to live in harmony with her stepmother and her stepsister - a girl who was once her best friend at school?

The Girl Who Wanted to Belong is the true story of one of the many children long-time foster carer Angela Hart has taken in over the years. Angela's stories show the difference that quiet care, a watchful eye, and sympathetic ear can make to children whose upbringing has been less fortunate than others.

A movingly written true tale of a little girl who only wanted to be loved and tried to obtain this by helping – rather obsessively, as she didn’t know better.

Angela Hart writes about the children she fosters and this is the first of her stories that I’ve read, but it really moved me. She, and her husband, had immense patience with this lovely little girl who was just a bundle of energy, but who also had no real ways of getting rid of this energy. Especially, as she struggled with reading and writing. And sitting still. A child who needed to keep her hands occupied and was physical rather than mental in her outlook on life.

Unfortunately, her father seemed to be easily cowed by his new partner, who had a girl of a very similar age and who wanted her child to be the head of the family of children rather than Lucy. And to a very large extent it would seem, invented disruptive behaviour from Lucy or ensured it, in order to get her removed from the family. Lucy never really settled anywhere as she always believed that her father loved her and would have her back home, soon.

Good on you Angela. May you foster many more children! And write about them to encourage more people to take on fostering.

 

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How often do you Lie? Jody discusses this.

I Never Lie Book Cover I Never Lie
Jody Sabral
psychological, mystery, thriller, literary fiction
Canelo
11th June 2018
Kindle

Is she the next victim? Or is she the culprit?

Alex South is a high-functioning alcoholic who is teetering on the brink of oblivion. Her career as a television journalist is hanging by a thread since a drunken on-air rant. When a series of murders occur within a couple of miles of her East London home she is given another chance to prove her skill and report the unfolding events. She thinks she can control the drinking, but soon she finds gaping holes in her memory, and wakes to find she’s done things she can’t recall. As the story she’s covering starts to creep into her own life, is Alex a danger only to herself – or to others?

This gripping psychological thriller is perfect for fans of Fiona Barton, B A Paris and Clare Mackintosh.

An Interview with Jody Sabral

Can you tell your readers something about why you chose this particular topic to write about? What appealed to you about it? Why do you think it is different and your approach is unique?

I think the topic chose me in a way. I lived with an alcoholic for a year and felt the need to write about it in a realistic way. To capture the absolute denial of it and what the impact of that can be on everyone who comes into contact with it. I think it’s unique in the sense that I lived up close with it and therefore have a real passion for the issue. I’m not just using it as a plot ploy in a flippant manner. I hope it starts a positive conversation around alcoholism as I feel it’s something that is lacking in this country. I’ve always felt that literature and art can have a much longer lasting impact than that of news, the other business I’m in, so I guess I wanted to bring this to my novel, which I hope is also extremely entertaining. I still recall scenes from books I read ten or fifteen years ago and they make me think differently about the world we live in.

How long do you think about a topic before deciding to write about it? Do you have a set of notes or a notebook where you write down topics that appeal before making a decision as to which topic this time?

 Not really, for me it’s a very organic process. I think we all have themes in our lives that we feel strongly about for one reason or another and my writing is born from that. I’ve just completed a screenplay in which the main themes were born out of reading an article in the newspaper and a conversation with my niece. I felt strongly about the issues so I wanted to write about them.

3. How long does it take to research a topic before you write? And for this book?

It depends. I tend to pull off my experiences and those of friends. I’m not writing police procedurals. Yes, I have an investigation and an investigator but the emphasis is on the characters affected by it and the impact it has on them. So I tend to write about people’s emotions, which I think is about connections and the human condition. People fascinate me, so my writing is born out of conversations with others and observations about how people deal with a crisis.

How helpful do you find authority figures such as the police when you say you want to write about them? Is there a good way to approach them in your experience?

As a journalist I’ve always found them very helpful and happy to cooperate. I have contacts who will read to see if it’s plausible and they will tell me if it’s not working.

5. How many times have you been rejected before your first novel was accepted or before this book was accepted?

I’m proud to say upwards of sixty-five rejections in my writing career. Obviously with this novel it was different as my agent handled those rejections. But with the two earlier books, the first CHANGING BORDERS I sent it out to almost thirty agents and got a heap of rejections. The second, THE MOVEMENT, which I won the CWA Debut Dagger for got me lots of interest from agents, yet many more rejections. I met my agent on the back end of those rejections. He had the foresight to ask me what I was working on next and a partnership was formed. He’s been with me since the conception of I NEVER LIE and it’s a very supportive and nurturing relationship. Finally I have someone behind me, believing in my work. What I will say to aspiring writers is just keep at it, at some point something will give.

Did you need to self-publish on e-books before a publisher took you up?

I think you self-publish because you want to put it out there. To move on to a new project. To draw a line under it. But self-publishing has its pitfalls. Selling a book is a full time job.

Would you recommend self-publishing and building an audience before approaching a publisher? If so, what benefits do you see that it might have for the aspiring novelist?

I found self-publishing to be a very tough sell even though I had an audience of millions at the time that I wrote CHANGING BORDERS because I was a foreign correspondent on TV regularly. I write. I’m not a marketing person so I found that part of it tricky. It depends on your skills. If you’re good at sales and marketing I suppose you’d be in with a better chance than me. I don’t think there’s one perfect route. It’s a personal journey, but the important point is that you keep writing because at the end of the day it’s the words that will eventually pay off and resonate with someone. I like the support I have with an agent and publisher behind me because writing is a solitary job.

Does writing provide sufficient income to live on? And how long did it take before this happened?

Not yet. This is my first novel to be released via a publisher, so let’s see!

What is the funniest thing that happened to you on a book tour?

I haven’t done a book tour yet, so not sure I can answer this. But some interesting people have a copy of my first book. Sir Patrick Stewart has one via someone I met on a plane, and the musician Moby. I inscribed on Moby’s copy, ‘if you like it Tweet it!’ Obviously he didn’t, but you have to be your own ambassador for your work in a competitive environment. Maybe one day he’ll tweet about I NEVER LIE, who knows!

What do you read when you are ill in bed?

I don’t get ill very often. I write a lot in bed though.

 What is your favourite genre?

Crime obviously. I like Sci-fi too because it makes you think about the bigger questions in life as in ‘why are we here?’

If you recommend a living author – who would it be? A dead author?

That’s tough because there are so many amazing authors dead and alive. J G Ballard is my all time fav. Living, there’s just so many. It’s like asking me what my favourite song is, it changes all the time. I really love Gillian Flynn, S J Watson, Nicki French, John Le Carre’s earlier works…. I mean the list just goes on.

Which author had the most influence on your writing? Your writing style? Your writing genre?

Dan Brown possibly? I’m not a literary writer. It’s pacy and not overly descriptive. I don’t read as much as I used to, which may shock some people, but that’s because I find that other writer’s voices get into my own and presently I’m trying to hone my own, which I think I did with I NEVER LIE. I found my voice with this book and that’s a very satisfying feeling.

In your opinion who is the funniest author now writing?

I think the best comedy writers of the moment for me are Sharon Horgan and Phoebe Waller-Bridge, oh and Charlie Brooker, but they write for TV, which I’m also attempting to do after attending an evening class in screenwriting. I tend to watch more comedy on TV than read it in books.

Have you ever tried to imitate another author’s style? And if so, why?

When I was retraining from journalist to novelist during my MA at City University I used to copy sentences from Raymond Chandler’s books word for word into a notebook then change the adjectives for my own, I did this so I could try to capture the show aspect of writing rather than tell. As a broadcast journalist I’ve had to work on my description a lot because news writing is stripped back and we don’t use a lot of adjectives. I think Chandler’s writing is all about the atmosphere, which he creates through even just describing the materials in a room. He is my guru of descriptive writing.

What have you done with the things you wrote when in school?

Sadly, they’ve been lost over the years as I left home at sixteen and moved endlessly to a million different flats and many countries. So if you find a diary in a charity shop somewhere one day that has me name in it, please return it to me!

About the Author

Jody Sabral is based in London, where she works as a Foreign Desk editor and video producer at the BBC. She is a graduate of the MA in Crime Fiction at City University, London. Jody worked as a journalist in Turkey for ten years, covering the region for various international broadcasters. She self-published her first book Changing Borders in 2012 and won the CWA Debut Dagger in 2014 for her second novel The Movement . In addition to working for the BBC, Jody also writes for the Huffington Post , AlMonitor and BRICS Post .

Twitter: @jsabral

I Never Lie will be followed by Dont Blame Me in early 2019, which will explore the dark side of instant celebrity culture and the deadly  consequences of overnight success.

Canelo books can be found on Amazon, Kobo, Apple and Google Books – some books will be limited to UK publication places only:

Amazon (UK)

Kobo (UK)

Google Books (UK)

Apple Books (UK)

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If He Wakes: Zoe explains

If He Wakes Book Cover If He Wakes
Zoe Lea
Fiction, thriller, Psychological Thriller
Canelo
April 30, 2018
300

You can always trust your best friend... can’t you? When Rachel discovers a Twitter message arranging a romantic liaison she assumes her husband is having an affair, and follows him. What she witnesses is so much worse: a hit and run using his car. Meanwhile, Rachel’s friend and business partner Suzie is increasingly worried about her fiance, who’s not been in touch for days. When Suzie learns of huge debts racked up in her name she fears he has run out on her, but then the threatening calls start and she thinks something terrible has happened. Rachel and Suzie are both about to learn shocking things about the men they love, worse than they could ever imagine... Can their friendship survive? 'A tense, pulse-quickening tale. If you read the first chapter, you can’t help but read the second. I flew through this perfect summer read of best friends in turmoil in one feverish session.' Paula Daly

ZOE LEA – IF HE WAKES

 1.Can you tell your readers something about why you chose this particular topic to write about? What appealed to you about it? Why do you think it is different and your approach is unique?

I got the initial idea for If He Wakes, and that very early idea would just not leave me alone.  I wrote about it because I couldn’t not write about it, and I realise how corny that sounds!
The idea of complete betrayal appealed to me, and although If He Wakes is similar to a lot of other books out there in this genre, I think the way it handles female friendship is a little different. In so much as it’s the central characters friendship that’s the narrative spine of the book, not the horrific acts that surround it.

  1. How long do you think about a topic before deciding to write about it? Do you have a set of notes or a note book where you write down topics that appeal before making a decision as to which topic this time?

I usually think about a topic for quite a while before starting to write about it.  I like to keep a note book and write down the initial premise and then continue to add to it until I’m pretty sure the structure the book will take, by that time, I know if I’ve got a whole book or not.

  1. How helpful do you find authority figures such as the police when you say you want to write about them? Is there a good way to approach them in your experience?

I’m lucky in that I have several friends who work in the force and one in particular that is happy to answer all of my questions!

  1. How many times have you been rejected before your first novel was accepted or before this book was accepted?

Too many times to remember!  I’ve been writing in one from or another for years so getting rejections is part and parcel of it all.

  1. Would you recommend self-publishing and building an audience before approaching a publisher? If so, what benefits do you see that it might have for the aspiring novelist?

This is hard one because there are two schools of thought, I know people who have an amazing online presence and because of that, have been approached by agents and publishers.  However, if the book you write isn’t up to scratch, I don’t think it will make any difference how big your audience is.  It always comes down to the quality of work in the end.

  1. What do you read when you are ill in bed?

I like to read a good escapist novel when I’m looking for a book to nurture me, something that will help me forget where I am and transport me to a different world.

  1. What is your favourite genre?

Mystery and crime.  It can be any genre, so long as there’s an element of mystery or crime to the plot, I like to read something and try to solve it.

  1. Which author had the most influence on your writing? Your writing style? Your writing genre?

Stephen King has had the biggest influence on me and my writing.  His book, ‘On Writing,’ is a must read for anyone who is writing at the moment or thinking of becoming a writer.

Links to Book:

Amazon (UK)

Kobo (UK)

Google Books (UK)

Apple Books (UK)

Author Bio:

Zoe Lea lives in the Lake District with her husband, their two children, three dogs and peregrine falcons. She has previously worked as a teacher, photographer and freelance journalist and is a writer in the day and a reader by night. If He Wakes is her debut novel.

Twitter: @zoe___lea

Instagram: ZoeLeaWriter

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