The babies that we never meet

The Idea of You Book Cover The Idea of You
Amanda Prowse
Womens' Literature, Women's Fiction, contemporary fiction
Lake Union Publishing
(21 Mar. 2017)

What if the one thing you want is the only thing you can’t have?

With her fortieth birthday approaching, Lucy Carpenter thinks she finally has it all: a wonderful new husband, Jonah, a successful career and the chance of a precious baby of her own. Life couldn’t be more perfect.

But becoming parents proves much harder to achieve than Lucy and Jonah imagined, and when Jonah’s teenage daughter Camille comes to stay with them, she becomes a constant reminder of what Lucy doesn’t have. Jonah’s love and support are unquestioning, but Lucy’s struggles with work and her own failing dreams begin to take their toll. With Camille’s presence straining the bonds of Lucy’s marriage even further, Lucy suddenly feels herself close to losing everything…

This heart-wrenchingly poignant family drama from bestselling author Amanda Prowse asks the question: in today’s hectic world, what does it mean to be a mother?

We don’t cry enough for the babies we lose (in early pregnancy). I certainly didn’t.

For over 20 years I ignored them and then I went into a church and saw the lists of babies that had died in early childhood and it reminded me of the babies we had lost. And I cried. I felt so sad about those children who had not joined our family.

And this book reminded me of those losses and I cried again not just for me, but for the central characters too. I empathised too much perhaps?

This is a book that starts as a second chance romance and slowly becomes a story about the children we desire through our procreation imperative  which when not fulfilled drives so many into despair and depression.

And yet there is a happy ending that is not the case for all. The author’s own experience gives this story that extra edge that rings of truth telling.

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Small but deadly

Pint Sized Protector
Bad Boy Inc #2
Eve Langlais
romantic suspense, contemporary
Eve Langlais
(10 Oct. 2017)

Now there is one thing I learnt in Judo when I was younger that being pint -sized myself gave you several advantages when fighting tall and bulky males.

1. They underestimated you. And

2. You could get under their guard and throw them down before they knew it, as your centre of gravity was underneath theirs.

So being pint sized, if you are feisty, is often a good thing.

So enjoyed this feisty kickass pint-sized female story as it had resonations…

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Saga? No.

Mark of Fire Book Cover Mark of Fire
Endarian Prohecy #1
Richard Phillips
coming of age, epic, contemporary
47North
(1 Nov. 2017)

Lorness Carol, coming of age in the kingdom of her warlord father, Lord Rafel, aspires to wield magic. But she’s also unknowingly become the obsession of Kragan, an avenging wielder as old as evil itself. He’s waited centuries to find and kill the female prophesied as the only human empowered to destroy him. However, dispatching the king’s assassin, Blade, to Rafel’s Keep, ends in treason. For Blade arrives not with a weapon but rather a warning for the woman he’s known and loved since he was a child. With a price on his head, Blade flees—as Carol and her family are urged away on their own desperate route of escape.

Now, traversing the lawless western borderlands, Carol struggles to understand the uncanny magic she possesses and must learn to master. Though separated, Carol and Blade are still united—not only by the darkness pursuing them both but by a quest toward destiny, revenge, and the revelations of an ancient prophecy that signal the ultimate war between good and evil.

I’m still looking for a replacement author for David Eddings. This author isn’t it.

I only managed a couple of chapters.

 

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Why enter retail?

The Shop on Main Book Cover The Shop on Main
Comfort Crossing #1
Kay Correll
contemporary
Rose Quartz Press
(14 July 2014)
208

Sometimes, doing the right thing backfires... Bella Amaud is desperate when she learns her business and the home she lives in with her two boys is about to be whiskedout from under her. As shescrambles to maintain her fragile financial security andindependence, she fears she may lose more than just The Shop on Main and her home. Nothing is working out like Bella planned-she finds out the man she is falling for, Owen Campbell, is the businessman at the center of all her problems. Owen has secretly longed to belong-somewhere-anywhere-his whole life. When he decides to give his long-lost brother, Jake, back his birthright, he unknowingly thwarts his briefly held hope of a place where he can put down roots and a family he longs for. Nothing is working out like Owen planned-neither Bella nor Jake wants anything to do with him. How can a man who is used to being in control and a woman determined to make it all on her own find a way to happiness? The Shop on Main is Book One of the Comfort Crossing series. Bella and her best friends, Jenny and Becky Lee, navigate the heartaches and triumphs of love and life in thesmall southern town of Comfort Crossing, Mississippi.

This is another storyline which doesn’t make logical sense and was never explained.

If her husband wanted the divorce, and she was not in any way in the wrong:

  • Why wasn’t he paying her sufficient alimony and child support to enable her to live in the style to which she and the children were accustomed?
  • And, why wasn’t she still living in the family home?

Any good divorce lawyer/judge would have allocated these items to her without fail.

So bearing that in mind, the remainder of the story doesn’t make sense as the original premise on which it is based doesn’t.

At no point does she even fight for herself – any lawyer would take on her case for a percentage as she was so clearly in the wrong.

This type of story, where the women are lacking in spine and any ability to think logically and clearly annoy me.

 

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When you need to Question

36 Questions that changed my mind about you Book Cover 36 Questions that changed my mind about you
Vicki Grant
contemporary fiction, romance, humour
Hot Key Books
(19 Oct. 2017)

36 questions guaranteed to make two strangers fall head over heels in love with each other? What's not to like. A clever, wry, funny, rom-com. For fans of The Rosie Project.

Inspired by the real psychology study popularized by the New York Times and its "Modern Love" column, this contemporary YA/crossover is perfect for fans of Eleanor and Park, Jo Jo Moyes, Carrie Hope Fletcher and Cecila Ahern.

Two random strangers. Thirty-six questions to make them fall in love. 

Hildy and Paul each have their own reasons for taking part in the psychology study (in Paul's case it is the $40, in Hildy's the reasons are significantly more complex). The study poses the simple question: Can love be engineered between two random strangers?

Hildy and Paul must ask each other 36 questions, ranging from "What is your most terrible memory?" to "When did you last sing to yourself?" By the time Hildy and Paul have made it to the end of the questionnaire, they've laughed and cried and lied and thrown things and run away and come back again. They've also each discovered the painful secret the other was trying so hard to hide. But have they fallen in love?

A book that started really well but failed to deliver on its initial promise.

The psychology experiment was well described but the story it finally told was not as gripping and in my opinion their issues were not worth the effort of discovering the answers.

I debated as to whether to class this as a 3 or a 2, but will give the benefit  of the experiment being genuine and one that interests me, and go for a 3.

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