Not so much a Break as a Hiatus

The Break Book Cover The Break
Marian Keyes
literary fiction, romantic comedy
Michael Joseph
September 7, 2017
576

The Break is the brand new funny, touching and truly fabulous novel from Marian Keyes . . . 'Myself and Hugh . . . We're taking a break.' 'A city-with-fancy-food sort of break?' If only. Amy's husband Hugh says he isn't leaving her. He still loves her, he's just taking a break - from their marriage, their children and, most of all, from their life together. Six months to lose himself in south-east Asia. And there is nothing Amy can say or do about it. Yes, it's a mid-life crisis, but let's be clear: a break isn't a break up - yet . . . However, for Amy it's enough to send her - along with her extended family of gossips, misfits and troublemakers - teetering over the edge. For a lot can happen in six-months. When Hugh returns if he returns, will he be the same man she married? And will Amy be the same woman? Because if Hugh is on a break from their marriage, then isn't she? The Break isn't a story about falling in love but about staying in love. It is Marian Keyes at her funniest, wisest and brilliant best. 'A born storyteller' Independent on Sunday 'When it comes to writing page-turners that put a smile on your face and make you think, Keyes is in a class of her own' Daily Express

I loved this book and read it and read it and read it. So much happened and the writing style engaged me and encouraged me to just keep on reading.

I am not normally a fan of Irish family dramas, but this was different and a grand exception.

This is a very modern mixed-up family. the children from many marriages and even one not ‘belonging’ to them. All provided for in a rather ramshackle way by Clare and then with her husband helping out – but not her previous husband at all… or the parents of the ‘not theirs’ child.

I am not sure how i would have coped with all her responsibilities. flying to and fro London and Ireland. running a commission based business with 2 lovely partners but still effectively self-employed. and not earning that much after expenses – which are high in the PR world. still establishing a business name, still trying to manage her wayward clients, still trying to help her girls through school and exams and business start-ups. and then there is her father with Alzheimer’s and her mother wanting help.

I am surprised she doesn’t have a complete break-down. but maybe she does? Maybe her behaviour is a breakdown of sorts – and who can blame her?

 

 

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Jewel Fire

Opal Fire Book Cover Opal Fire
Stacey Justice #1
Barbra Annino
Fiction
Thomas & Mercer
December 18, 2012
267

Small-town reporter and witch Stacy Justice has her hands full when her cousin Cinnamon's bar is set on fire, the investigation of which reveals that someone wants Stacy dead, and that her so-called magic skills are rusty.

A cosy mystery with witches whose magic is gentle, ‘seeing’ and healing mainly – the Wise Women.

It is written in the 1st person as the story unfolds so you know only what Stacy knows; thus very difficult to know the solution to the mystery in advance. You need to read on to find out who dun it and why.

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Ireland and Mercy

A book set in Ireland just past World War Two providing an accurate atmosphere of these times – even down to the writing style of the author.
Although the writing style is a little archaic in its lack of details in some areas it still provides evocative descriptions. It just takes some time to get used to.
This is not a fast paced thriller. This is a slow train that travels forward to an inevitable conclusion where the bad are all punished.
I found myself initially uncertain as Irish writing styles are often confusing to me, but gradually I was drawn into the story and its truth of Irish life in the 1950s.
Some of the words were unusual and I needed a dictionary to look up – unusual for me, but panjandrum (a person who has or claims to have a great deal of authority or influence as used in the 19th century), and crepitant (making a crackling sound) were really new to me! But were used correctly in the book…
However, I did know about the Mercy Laundries and the whole Roman Catholic treatment of women who had ‘sinned’ and how the Nuns worked the girls and women in these places and took them in on the word of a parent/relative or priest whether or not the girl was agreeable or even against her will.
Another 4 star book with an excellent story to tell.

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