And the Truth is?

Where the Truth Lies Book Cover Where the Truth Lies
DI Ridpath #1
M J Lee
crime fiction
Canelo
22nd October 2018

A killer in total control. A detective on the edge. A mystery that HAS to be solved.

DI Thomas Ridpath was on the up in the Manchester CID: a promising young detective whose first case involved capturing a notorious serial killer. But ten years later he’s recovering from a serious illness and on the brink of being forced out of the police. Then people start dying: tortured, murdered, in an uncanny echo of Ridpath’s first case.

As the investigation intensifies, old bodies go missing, records can’t be found and the murder count grows. Caught in a turf war between the police and the coroner’s office, digging up skeletons some would rather forget, Ridpath is caught in a race against time: a race to save his career, his marriage… And lives.

When a detective goes missing everything is on the line. Can Ridpath close the case and save his colleague?

WHERE THE TRUTH LIES is a nail-biting crime thriller, full of breathtaking twists and turns in this fast-paced and extraordinarily original novel. Perfect for fans of Mark Billingham, Peter James and Faith Martin

 

‘We seek evidence, it’s all that counts. The truth always lies. Only evidence is clear. Pure, unadulterated evidence.’

This is the quote that is at the heart of this book. It is used to explain the difference between the police and how they find a criminal and bring him/her to court, and the Coroner’s office and their investigations. In the Coroner’s office, they look for the truth. The truth of how a person died. How they died and where. And sometimes, they also look for who might have committed a crime – if what they find out indicates it.

So sometimes, the police use evidence to put someone in prison for a crime they did not commit but the evidence is there for the court- or sometimes it is put there.

In this story, the evidence is manipulated it appears as one body is lost and others are found.

I really liked this story and the way it was told. I felt I could understand the motives of the Coroner and Tom and his wife. This is crime writing at its best.

About the Author

M J Lee has spent most of his adult life writing in one form or another. As a university researcher in history, he wrote pages of notes on reams of obscure topics. As a social worker with Vietnamese refugees, he wrote memoranda. And, as the creative director of an advertising agency, he has written print and press ads, TV commercials, short films and innumerable backs of cornflake packets and hotel websites.

He has spent 25 years of his life working outside the north of England, in London, Hong Kong, Taipei, Singapore, Bangkok and Shanghai, winning advertising awards from Cannes, One Show, D&AD, New York and the United Nations.

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And her name was?

Her Name was Rose Book Cover Her Name was Rose
Claire Allan
psychological, suspense, contemporary, police procedurals, romance
Avon Books
June 28, 2018
352

'AMAZING. I read it in one go. I was totally hooked.' MARIAN KEYES 'Utterly addictive. Compulsive, twisty, tense.' CLAIRE DOUGLAS, author of Local Girl Missing Her name was Rose. You watched her die. And her death has created a vacancy. When Emily lets a stranger step out in front of her, she never imagines that split second will change her life. But after Emily watches a car plough into the young mother - killing her instantly - she finds herself unable to move on. And then she makes a decision she can never take back. Because Rose had everything Emily had ever dreamed of. A beautiful, loving family, a great job and a stunning home. And now Rose's husband misses his wife, and their son needs a mother. Why couldn't Emily fill that space? But as Emily is about to discover, no one's life is perfect ... and not everything is as it seems.

I thought this was a great read. At first yu think, OK, I know this story, then you find that you really don’t.

The twist at the end I never saw coming – which is what makes a good suspense novel – otherwise no suspense – right?

But, I did find the Epilogue content expected but forgivable under the circumstances of this being billed as a Romance imprint.

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That which lasts..

Durable Goods Book Cover Durable Goods
Cole and Callahan Thriller
Patricia Hale
Fiction, suspense, thriller, psychological
Intrigue Publishing, LLC
April 15, 2018
215

Detective John Stark approaches the PI team of Griff Cole and Britt Callahan with a postcard he's sure is from his estranged daughter, Kira. She's been listed as a runaway for three years by Portland, Maine police but John isn't convinced that her continued absence is by choice. As Stark's long-time friends, Cole and Callahan agree to look into the postcard marked only with the letters OK. The postmark leads them to Oracles of the Kingdom, a farm where women sell fresh produce in return for a fresh start with God. But nothing seems right about the town or the farm and Britt goes undercover to look for Kira. Once inside, she realizes that Oracles of the Kingdom is not the refuge it appears.

And can be re-used…

This was a read that really tests your belief in pastors and religion and demonstrates how easily they can twisted to one person’s beliefs and self.

Here we see a so-called pastor preying on girls who had lost their self-esteem and thus believed that they were worthless and when they found a ‘saviour’ behaved according to his rules. Even when those rules were harmful to them. This is how cults work. They take those who are needy and work on their self-esteem until only the cult can fulfil those needs. They become grateful for what is supplied – food, shelter, and if it is abuse, then they believe that it is justified.

And often fathers are just as much to blame in a patriarchal society as they can idolise the sons and use and re-use the daughters with both mental and physical abuse until the girls are lost.

But isn’t courage doing what is right and good even when you are afraid? And we see this courage in action in this story.

I found the story disturbing and hard to read at times but somehow the writing didn’t quite flow as well as a 5 star book, so 4 it is.

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Exhibiting Who?

Exhibit Alexandra Book Cover Exhibit Alexandra
Natasha Bell
literary fiction, relationships, psychological, thriller
Michael Joseph
Mar 2018

This story I have to tell is more than a collection of facts. I have no reason to paint a better or worse picture than what really happened. I've already lost everything.'

Alexandra Southwood is missing. Her husband is beside himself, or at least he appears to be. She has vanished into thin air; the only traces left are her bloodied clothes by the riverside. It isn't long before the police are searching for a body.

But we know that she is alive. That she is being kept somewhere far from her family. That perhaps this wife and mother wasn't quite what she seemed . . .

Be warned: this isn't another missing-woman thriller. This is something far more shocking . . .

I’ve been trying to read this book for several days now and keep getting side tracked into reading something else. The style is pleasant but the storyline is not gripping. In some ways it is too familiar – someone goes missing. They are being held by an unknown person in a basement/locked room. The food is bad. The family are worried especially the young children and the husband finds it difficult to cope.

Can I be bothered to read further? I got as far as 23% and still not gripped.

They say it isn’t like any other missing woman thriller but I was not convinced enough to carry on.

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And Hygge is…

Hygge and Kisses Book Cover Hygge and Kisses
Clara Christenson
romance, women's fiction
Simon and Schuster
Nov 2017

The perfect feel-good novel to curl up with - light some candles, wrap yourself in a blanket and relax ...

Bo, 26, has always been careful, cautious. However, she's just been made redundant and her life plan is beginning to unravel. Before she starts immediately applying for other jobs in a panic, her friend Kirstenpersuades her to take a holiday, to visit Kirsten's mother's house in Aalborg, North Jutland, a part of Denmark Bo is ashamed to admit she has never heard of.

'What's the weather going to be like?' she asks Kirsten hopefully, scrolling her cursor over the budget airlines webpage. 'Terrible,' Kirsten replies, 'London is positively Mediterranean by comparison, and of course it's November so it'll be dark seventeen hours a day. But no one goes to Denmark to get a tan. You need a change of scene and to blow away the cobwebs, and trust me, Skagen will do that. Besides, the summerhouse is cosy whatever the weather, and you never know who else will be around.'

A few clicks later and there is no going back. And Bo's life plan is about to be entirely rewritten.

A nice book in this genre – but isn’t hygge becoming a trifle cliched – what with the cashmere throws (that no-one can afford) and the candles and the ‘real fires – which can’t be used because of pollution and the environment?

I recently read The Little Cafe in Copenhagen which reminded me that I had never finished this book. i had read the initial sampling offered and enjoyed it so received the full book from NetGalley for a final review.

I have to say, that I am very pleased that there was no cafe opening up in this book – not even a food stall in a market as again that is so a cliche. Why is it that all these women are portrayed as being good bakers of cakes? And can learn and reproduce recipes so quickly and easily? That is not really all we women can do – honest! Personally, if i had my life again, I might have become a gardener or garden designer – or owner of a garden nursery. How hygge are Dutch tulips I wonder?

And hyggeligt is a way of unity – and the derivation of hygge.

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