How much can we know when young?

EVERYTHING I KNOW ABOUT LOVE
DOLLY. ALDERTON
friendship, women's fiction, relationships, family
Penguin
Feb 2019

ith courageous honesty, Alderton documents the highs and the lows - the sex, the drugs, the nightmare landlords, the heartaches and the humiliations. Deeply funny, sometimes shocking, and admirably open-hearted and optimistic' Daily Telegraph

'A sensitive, astute and funny account of growing up millennial' Observer

'Alderton proves a razor-sharp observer of the shifting dynamics of long term female friendship' Mail on Sunday

'The book we will thrust into our friends' hands . . . that will help heal a broken heart. Alderton's wise words can resonate with women of all ages. She feels like a best friend and your older sister all rolled into one and her pages wrap around you like a warm hug' Evening Standard

'I loved its truth, self awareness, humour and most of all, its heart spilling generosity' Sophie Dahl

'Steeped in furiously funny accounts of one-night stands, ill-advised late-night taxi journeys up the M1, grubby flat-shares and the beauty of female friendships, as Alderton joyfully booze-cruises her way through her twenties' Metro

'It's so full of life and laughs - I gobbled up this book. Alderton has built something beautiful and true out of many fragments of daftness' Amy Liptrot

A memoir rather than an autobiography, based on truth and articles and columns previously published.

An insight (for me) into the world of the millenials and their lives as renters and users of dating apps and drinking especially.

We drank as students, of course we did, and there were some drugs about too, but I married young and so never really experienced a long period of post-uni dating. We did share though, even after marriage as we just couldn’t afford our flat without ‘lodgers’, so we turned a 2 bed flat into a 3 bed and lived without much of a lounge except when we all sat together to watch TV on one guy’s bed-sofa. As I stopped being a post-grad and started earning money our flat-mates gradually moved out – the last with a bit of a push!

This book was brutally truthful. a real soul baring of life as lived by Dolly. Her life’s highs and lows. Love and loss. And it cannot help but affect the reader.

I suspect we all recognise something of ourselves (especially women) in Dolly and it certainly made me think about myself and my behaviours and how they did or did not match up.

And thanks for the recipes, Dolly. I intend to make the ice-cream and a variant on the apple pizza one day – not the marzipan though as this would be just too sweet for our taste.

Share This:

Exhibiting Who?

Exhibit Alexandra Book Cover Exhibit Alexandra
Natasha Bell
literary fiction, relationships, psychological, thriller
Michael Joseph
Mar 2018

This story I have to tell is more than a collection of facts. I have no reason to paint a better or worse picture than what really happened. I've already lost everything.'

Alexandra Southwood is missing. Her husband is beside himself, or at least he appears to be. She has vanished into thin air; the only traces left are her bloodied clothes by the riverside. It isn't long before the police are searching for a body.

But we know that she is alive. That she is being kept somewhere far from her family. That perhaps this wife and mother wasn't quite what she seemed . . .

Be warned: this isn't another missing-woman thriller. This is something far more shocking . . .

I’ve been trying to read this book for several days now and keep getting side tracked into reading something else. The style is pleasant but the storyline is not gripping. In some ways it is too familiar – someone goes missing. They are being held by an unknown person in a basement/locked room. The food is bad. The family are worried especially the young children and the husband finds it difficult to cope.

Can I be bothered to read further? I got as far as 23% and still not gripped.

They say it isn’t like any other missing woman thriller but I was not convinced enough to carry on.

Share This:

Mojitos and Cakes: good combination

Washington Witches Book Cover Washington Witches
Books #1-#3
Mindy Klasky.
humour, contemporary, fantasy
Kindle

This boxed set introduces Jane Madison, a librarian who finds out she’s a witch.

Girl’s Guide to Witchcraft begins the series, introducing Jane to her magical abilities—as well as to her quirky feline familiar and her overbearing astral protector. The story continues in Sorcery and the Single Girl, when Jane is invited to join her exclusive local coven—but only if she succeeds in working a prodigious spell. Next up is Magic and the Modern Girl, when Jane discovers the consequences of letting her powers lie fallow a little too long.

Along the way, Jane quests for true love, a relationship with the long-absent mother who abandoned her years before, and the perfect mojito to share with her bakery-owning best friend.

This boxed set contains bonus recipes related to the series!

The Washington Witches Series includes:

Girl's Guide to Witchcraft
Sorcery and the Single Girl
Magic and the Modern Girl
Capitol Magic
Single Witch's Survival Guide
Joy of Witchcraft
"Dreaming of a Witch Christmas"

 

Good for this type of genre. But  on the side of easy reading.

 

 

 

Share This:

Messy? or just Chaotic

Hot Mess Book Cover Hot Mess
Lucy Vine
friendship, women's fiction, relationships, family
Orion
July 13, 2017
304

Hot Mess [n.] - someone who is often in a state of disarray, while remaining attractive in spite of their flaws, and repeatedly finds themselves in uncomfortable predicaments. Ellie Knight is just like you. Her life isn't turning out the way she thought it would. Some people might say she's a hot mess but then who really has their s**t together before they're thirty? It's Valentine's Day and Ellie Knight finds herself eating Nutella in the bar stockroom after a no-show date. But single doesn't have to be the loneliest number, does it? She goes back home to her flatshare and weird flatmates. It's ok there's black mould everywhere, right? With a hangover from hell, she goes to the office job she thought she would have quit by now. Doesn't everyone hate their job? Maybe Ellie isn't following the *official life plan* but perfect is overrated. For fans of Fleabag and Girls, this is a fresh and funny coming-of-age story with a single-girl heroine that everyone will relate to - a modern Carrie Bradshaw meets Bridget Jones.

 

I’m not quite the right age group for this I realised when I didn’t understand some of the references – clearly some were rather naughty, but perhaps I’m best off not knowing?

Still, I found it a enjoyable and funny book to read.

I loved the children and the office loos and had to read the section about the ‘virgin’ cocktails out to my husband as I thought it brilliant, as were the questions about periods. And oh, if we all could have not had them and had a choice…

For someone in the 20s and 30s I think that the adventures of the characters will really resonate. But as reader over 60 I object to having our smooches as being thought yucky! We still quite like kissing… and more…

4 stars

Share This:

How many men = 1?

Which man would you prefer?

The Lover?

The Handyman?

The Friend?

or someone else entirely?

Well if you can't decide, have one of each.

And this is where this book starts. Should we choose Hugh Grant or Colin Firth? Which will provide a lasting relationship? One to talk to, or one for sex or one for practical aspects? Why not have them all in 3 different men? And why are so many workplaces based on the traditional hierarchy? What happens if you rock the boat or challenge the norm? What does a modern woman want in a place to work?

The author says that the character wants to challenge the societal norm whereby women are 1 of 3 types: Florence Nightingale, mother and caretaker; Lady Macbeth and a dominatrix; or Jennifer Anniston, he trophy.

Men also have 3 traditional norms: the Boss with authority and fatherhood; the Lion from the Wizard of Oz, henpecked; or George Clooney the trophy.

She suggests that we might want to find a new way of operating. But these ideas seem very simplistic to me. I doubt if things are quite as black and white as she suggests. I  am sure my husband wouldn't recognise himself in any of these but he might be flattered by the 3rd role!

So who does she choose? You have to read the book to find out.

I was quite interested in this concept but did feel that, even though loosely based on the author's life, that there was something lacking in her analysis of types. Some deeper thinking about relationships for one to be successful needs to be done. that said, if you want a serious look at relationships you wouldn't pick this book up but go looking in the sociology or psychology shelves.

 

Share This: