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Convenient Marriage?

The Earl's Countess of Convenience Book Cover The Earl's Countess of Convenience
Penniless Brides of Convenience, Book 1
Marguerite Kaye
Romance , Women's Fiction, Historical
Mills and Boon
04 Apr 2019

A countess in name only…

…tempted by a night with her husband!

Part of Penniless Brides of Convenience: Eloise Brannagh has witnessed first-hand the damage unruly passion can cause. Yet she craves freedom, so a convenient marriage to the Earl of Fearnoch seems the perfect solution! Except Alexander Sinclair is more handsome, more intriguing, more everything, than Eloise anticipated. Having set her own rules for their marriage, her irresistible husband might just tempt Eloise to break them!

Once upon a time there was an Earl who need a bride in order to inherit his estate and sort out the mess and debts his profligate father and forebears had left him with. But where was he to get one? With money? And in need of a hasty marriage and preferably without the need for a marriage bed.

Not that he swung that way, but more that he couldn’t be bothered to have a real wife who would need him to do things with him.

And then there was a girl – or young woman more like, who also needed a hasty marriage, but she didn’t really have a fortune and to cap it all was American! And Trade! So not really a suitable marriage prospect at all.

But as with these novels the two were brought together and a marriage of convenience for them both, was organised.

A nice novel in this genre wit some amusing touches and well written even if sticking closely to the script. I like these as long as the heroine doesn’t simper, and this one didn’t!

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And Cornwall grows fine wines

The House at Greenacres Book Cover The House at Greenacres
Darcie Boleyn
contemporary fiction, romance, humour
Canelo escape

All roads lead home…

When Holly Dryden fled Penhallow Sands nearly a year ago she was determined to put the past – and Rich Turner – behind her. But now an unexpected loss and financial trouble has led her back to the family vineyard and it’s time to tell Rich the truth – he’s a father.

Surrounded by the memories of what they once shared Holly’s anger fades in the glow of Rich’s undeniable love for their son and the way he selflessly steps in to help the vineyard out of trouble. As Holly watches Rich flourish in his new role as father to baby Luke, she realises that though they can’t change the past, the future is still theirs to write…

An uplifting, emotional Cornwall-set romance perfect for fans of Holly Martin and Phillipa Ashley

This is a gentle second chance romance, set in Cornwall and their vineyards.

It is cosy in style and written so as to be fairly contemporary in language but not explicit in behaviour – the behaviour is implied as we have 2 pregnancies before marriage in it!

It is very family oriented and lauds the benefits of living within a multi-generational household unit – even though this can be very problematic as my mother-in-law would have attested if she admitted it… her mother being a tyrant..

Overall a very pleasant story and style, but for me a little too sweet, I prefer more drama and bite.

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What happens when? Caro; explains.

Suddenly Single
Carol Wyer
contemporary fiction, romance, Women’s Fiction
Canelo
8th April 2019

When bestselling romance author Chloe Piper’s marriage implodes a week before Christmas, she flees her cheating ex and the village gossips for the solitude of the newly built Sunny Meadow Farm and the company of her hapless dog, Ronnie.

But Chloe is soon pushed out of her comfort zone. Because with a lively development building crew – headed up by charming Alex – and a larger-than-life neighbour determined to make Chloe’s love life her pet project, Chloe finds herself in a whole new world of chaos…

This enthralling romantic comedy of self-discovery and new beginnings is perfect for fans of Kirsty Greenwood, Colleen Coleman and Marian Keyes.

  • Can you tell your readers something about why you chose this particular topic to write about? What appealed to you about it? Why do you think it is different and your approach is unique?

All my comedies have serious threads running through them and in this one I wanted to tackle the subject of self-confidence and especially social anxiety disorder. Many people suffer from this debilitating disorder that prevents them from mixing with others. Following the death of her parents and sister in a light plane crash, Chloe developed this disorder and struggled all her life with it. Her husband William used it to bully her and the story isn’t just one of finding love and friendship but of overcoming something that can really ruin people’s lives. When Chloe meets her new neighbour, a larger than life figure, who runs a singleton’s club and who won’t take no for an answer, she doesn’t realise at the time but she has taken the first step on a path that will aid her recovery. All the madcap events she attends, and people she meets, help her find out who she really is and that she is stronger than she believes she is. I am incredibly sympathetic towards people who suffer from this condition. I struggle at times with mild anxiety disorder but know others who find it too difficult to combat. I suppose that’s what makes the book different. It isn’t just a crazy, laugh-out-loud novel of people learning to enjoy life but puts a fresh spin on the heroine of the story and her lifeline – the hapless mongrel, Ronnie.

  • How long do you think about a topic before deciding to write about it? Do you have a set of notes or a note book where you write down topics that appeal before making a decision as to which topic this time?

All my books start as ideas – a series of scrawled notes in brand new notebook. Some can take months or years to be turned into a story. The idea for Suddenly Single came about in 2012 after we moved onto a half completed new development of only six houses. I jotted down notes and possible scenarios. A few months later, I added character notes and then stacked it in my ‘To Be Written’ pile of notebooks. I didn’t begin work on it until early 2018.

  • Did you need to self-publish on e-books before a publisher took you up?

I actually self-pubbed my first book in 2010. I’m not sure if I needed to but I simply didn’t have enough patience to wait for a publisher to pick it up and after three rejections, decided to go alone. As it turned out it wasn’t a bad move because the book did remarkably well and I was then offered a contract by a small publishing house. If I were to do it all again, however, I would definitely be more patient and by that, I mean wait up to a year or longer to get a contract with a publisher. It was extremely hard to make a name for myself and do all the marketing and promo as well as write a sequel.

  • In your opinion who is the funniest author now writing?

That’s tough because there are a lot of incredibly funny authors. I’ve always enjoyed Janet Evanovich and Ben Elton’s books. I suppose if I had to narrow it down to one person, I’d go for Caitlin Moran, the journalist and author of How to Build a Girl. She’ll make you sort tea from your nose.

  • What, in your life, are you most proud of doing?

There are a few things I’m proud of:

I learnt to fly a helicopter in my 40s

I got my PADI diving licence and dived with sharks for charity.

I took up stand-up comedy in my 50s and performed gigs around the Midlands.

I won The People’s Book Prize award in 2015 for Grumpy Old Menopause and was on BBC Breakfast television and Sky news.

But most of all, I am proud of my books. Every time I receive an emails or message from a reader saying how much they’ve enjoyed reading one of them, I feel ridiculously proud.

Author Bio:

As a child Carol Wyer was always moving, and relied on humour to fit in at new schools. A funny short story won her popularity, planting the seed of becoming a writer. Her career spans dry cleaning, running a language teaching company, and boxercise coaching. Now writing full-time, Carol has several books published and journalism in many magazines.

Carol won The People’s Book Prize Award for non-fiction (2015), and can sometimes be found performing her stand-up comedy routine Laugh While You Still Have Teeth.

Twitter: @carolewyer

Previous Books: What Happens in France

Links to Book:

Amazon (UK)

Kobo (UK)

Google Books (UK)

Apple Books (UK)

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And you thought no-one wanted an arranged marriage these days…

Arrange Me
#1: A married-at-first-sight romance (The Arranged Duo)
Katy Regenery
New Adult Romance, Romantic comedy, Romantic Suspense
Katharine Gilliam Regnery
February 23, 2019
258

My name is Courtney Jane Salinger...and I'm sick of games.Sick of the Friday night bar-scene-cum-meat-market. Sick of the boy-girl, man-woman, mars-venus, flirtation-without-expectation, game-playing nonsense.Sick of awful dates and one-night stands, booty calls and guys who don't call back, mixed messages or NO messages and-and-and...I'm sick of all of it. I'm done.I just can't do it anymore.It's too hard, and worse: little by little, it's making me hard.It's breaking my heart.What DO I want?That's easy.I want a house in suburbia with a white picket fence.I want babies to buckle into a minivan.But most of all, I want to be married.I want a husband.So I've made an important decision: I'm making my escape from the dating world and the single life.I've filled out my application on ArrangeMe.com and I'm putting my fate into the hands of experts.Is it a little scary?Sure.I mean, I have no idea who I'll end up with. After all, I'm planning to marry a complete stranger.But between you and me?I can't wait.Being arranged can't possibly be worse than being single.Can it?

A fun story of how a New Yorker got fed up with dating and never finding Mr Right.

Her solution was to do away with romance and dating and go to a marriage site  – for an arranged marriage. But the kicker being she would not meet in person her marriage partner until the wedding ceremony!

There were the expected highs and lows but with an interesting slant along the way. The style was nice, easy reading and very contemporary in feel.

This was no. 1 of a series.

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I ended very cheerful

Reasons to be cheerful Book Cover Reasons to be cheerful
Nina Stibbe
humour, romance, coming of age
Penguin
(28 Mar. 2019)

'When people in the village heard I was about to start working in the city they tried to unsettle me with tales of woe. The sun, blotted out by the tall buildings, couldn't shine and the rain was poisoned by the toxic fumes that poured from the sock factories. My skin would be covered in pimples from the hell of it all'

So begins a young woman's journey to adulthood. Lizzie Vogel leaves her alcoholic, novel-writing mother and heads for Leicester to work for a racist, barely competent dentist obsessed with joining the freemasons.

Soon Lizzie is heading reluctantly, if at top speed, into the murky depths of adult life: where her driving instructor becomes her best friend; her first boyfriend prefers birdwatching to sex and where independence for a teenage girl might just be another word for loneliness.

In Reasons to Be Cheerful Nina Stibbe shows her extraordinary gift for illuminating the vital details which make us human. She is that rare writer who makes us laugh whilst reminding us of the joy, and the pain, of being alive.

 A story that crept up on me until the life of our heroine Lizzie became so bizarre that I just had to keep on reading. Her mother, her family, friends and in particular her work at the dentist’s – JP Wintergreen -, became part of my fantasy life and dreams too. The discussions were absurd and yet, somehow resonated of the time.

Her mother was described as being a:

Drunk; divorcee; nudist; amphetamine addict; nymphomaniac; shop lifter; would-be novelist; poet; and playwright.

In that order.

And her boyfriend was clearly asexual or gay, she assumed, because he liked having freshly laundered clothes, made fruit salads, and once experimented with lemon in his tea. And most importantly of all, never got his penis out, despite her belief that it was often intended as a compliment.

We never really find out just how many pregnancies Lizzie’s mother had, or affairs, but we do realise, that due to her addictions, as a child, Lizzie and her elder siblings, more or less raised themselves in a rather eccentric and liberal household.

The oddities of Lizzie’s family and her work  and romances, are recounted in such a dry manner that I found it difficult not to become enthusiastic over the life of this town and want now to meet them all in real life please!

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