Irish Women are ….

Oh My God, What a Complete Aisling Book Cover Oh My God, What a Complete Aisling
Emer McLysaght; Sarah Bree
General Fiction (Adult) , Women's Fiction
Penguin UK - Michael Joseph
03 May 2018

Twenty-something Aisling - that's pronounced Ashling - is the sensible sort.

She wears kitten heels for the sake of her arches.

And a great night out is knowing the immersion heater at home is securely switched off.

In other words, country girl Aisling likes to play it safe in the big city.

But that hasn't helped get her man John to hurry up and pop the question.

Throwing caution to the wind an impatient Aisling tries to encourage him, only for her whole life to come crashing down.

Now no umbrella, electric blanket, nor sensibly sized heel can save her.

What's a complete Aisling to do?

I actually liked this book, even though I am not in general a fan of Irish fiction that is full of a. words that mean nothing to me; and b: humour that is not quite as I understand it.

But I managed to understand, after a few chapters, what an ‘Aisling’ was. No, not just an Irish name – which is very popular, but an Irish girl’s name for a girl from the hicks – the backwoods – who doesn’t understand city ways and doesn’t dress in a smart city manner and generally is a country hick.

But if you like your female characters to be funny and strong and full of life then this is the book for you. If you are not Irish you might struggle over some of the phrases and behaviours and references, but don’t let that put you off. There is a lot here to entertain and learn from.

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Hiding? Why?

The Art of Hiding Book Cover The Art of Hiding
Amanda Prowse
romance, contemporary, women's popular fiction
Lake Union Publishing
August 22, 2017
288

Nina McCarrick has it all: a loving husband, two beautiful boys, a well-appointed home and more time than she knows what to do with. Life is perfect. Until her husband, Finn, is killed in a car accident and everything Nina thought she could rely on unravels. Alone, bereft and faced with a mountain of debt, Nina quickly loses her life of luxury and she begins to question whether she ever really knew the man she married. Forced to move out of her family home, Nina returns to the rundown Southampton council estate--and the sister--she thought she had left far behind. But Nina can't let herself be overwhelmed--her boys need her. To save them, and herself, she will have to do what her husband discouraged for so long: pursue a career of her own. Torn between the life she thought she knew and the reality she now faces, Nina finally must learn what it means to take control of her life. Bestselling author Amanda Prowse once again plumbs the depths of human experience in this stirring and empowering tale of one woman's loss and love.

I have a problem with this book and the storyline. As soon as I read that the husband was dead I knew that the family would be bankrupt, forced to live elsewhere and very down-market and shabby. It was the too obvious next scene in the story.

Why didn’t Nina register as unemployed immediately? And why didn’t she ask for the flat to either have a reduced rent due to the condition? Or get her cousin to improve the state of it, especially as sleeping on old mattresses is very unhygienic. She could probably have got a loan from Social Services to buy a new one even.

And also, when you are told you are bankrupt, the first thing you do is to go through the house and wear all your jewellery – or hide it in your handbag or… AND take all the food in the cupboards and freezer instead of abandoning it. I realise it is not such a good storyline but still really.

So the main character annoyed me and I felt that the story could have been much better constructed.

 

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