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Cliff hangers

Code Named: Camelot Book Cover Code Named: Camelot
Noah Wolf
David Archer
Espionage, Military thriller, Spy, Intrigue
Kindle

After witnessing the murder-suicide of his parents as a child, Noah suffers from a form of PTSD that has left him without emotion, without a conscience and without the ability to function as a normal human being. With the help of childhood friends, he learns to watch others around him and mimic their behaviors, in order to conceal the fact that his mind operates more like a computer that he has spent years programming. That program is what allows Noah to pass himself off as normal, by establishing parameters of right and wrong that are completely inviolable to him.

As a young adult, Noah finds structure in the U.S. Army, and becomes an excellent and exemplary soldier, but when his self-imposed programming is put to the test by the murderous acts of the superior officer, Noah finds himself quickly made expendable, charged with crimes he did not commit and facing the possibility of execution. Without any reasonable hope for a reprieve, Noah's logic-based mind accepts his fate.

Sometimes, though, things are not all as they seem to be, and Noah is offered one chance to save himself. It was his disability, his lack of emotion, that made him the soldier he had become. Now, an ultrasecret organization known as E & E wants Noah's talents, offering him a chance to survive…

As the most deadly assassin the world has ever known.

A new favourite author for this series. Why? Because he is really naughty and ends all his books on a cliff hanger and then includes the first 2 or 3 chapters of the follow on book to get you hooked and buying…

So you read on because of the cliff hanger, and then you buy. My only complaint is that all his women are 2 dimensional, especially Sarah in this series. I’ve now read the entire series…!

Now either the author doesn’t know London or he is deliberately trying to mislead his readers. Either way I find it irritating – I’m sure even American readers will find it so. He mixes locations, names and invents places eg the London Borough of Canary Wharf. Doesn’t exist. It is Docklands and is in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. Unnecessary.  I’m not sure  why he does it.   

Books in order are:

  • The Way of the Wolf [prequel]
  • Code Name: Camelot
  • Lone Wolf
  • In Sheep’s Clothing
  • Hit for Hire
  • The Wolf’s Bite
  • Black Sheep
  • Balance of Power
  • Time to Hunt
  • Red Square
  • Highest  Order

                                                                                                                   

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How difficult is it to lie?

The Most Difficult Thing Book Cover The Most Difficult Thing
Charlotte Philby
General Fiction (Adult), contemporary, thriller, suspense
HarperCollins UK, HarperFiction

WHAT WOULD YOU SACRIFICE TO UNCOVER THE TRUTH?

‘Chilling’ Erin Kelly, author of He Said/She Said

‘Compulsive read’ Harriet Tyce, author of Blood Orange

‘Enigmatic’ Louise Candlish, author of Our House

‘Brilliant’ Jon Snow, Channel 4 News

On the surface, Anna Witherall personifies everything the aspirational magazine she works for represents. Married to her university boyfriend David, she has a beautiful home and gorgeous three-year-old twin daughters, Stella and Rose. But beneath the veneer of success and happiness, Anna is hiding a dark secret, one that threatens to unravel everything she has worked so hard to create.

As Anna finds herself drawn into the dark and highly controlled world of secret intelligence, she is forced to question her family’s safety, and her own. Only one thing is certain: in order to protect her children, she must leave them, forever. 

And someone is watching. Someone she thought she could trust. Someone who is determined to make them all pay.

Stylish and assured, The Most Difficult Thing is an irresistible combination of contemporary espionage and domestic suspense, and a compulsive, highly charged examination of betrayal.

How many lies make a truth?

Everyone in this story lies, and everyone has an ulterior motive. Personally, I never trusted Harry and Anna has invented herself and her family. Maria – well she was up to something right from the beginning, and Clive and David always had something to hide….

Now back to the actual story-telling. I found the middle section hard going and was tempted at times to stop reading. It seemed to be going nowhere and the constant flashing to and fro in time was distracting. But by Chapter 40 it had settled down into ‘proper’ story-telling and then along came Felicity again, and upset the apple-cart!

And as for the ending… most unexpected.

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