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What happens at the Academy: Book Blitz

I’m halfway to my dorm when I become aware of footsteps marching in time with mine.
I whirl around prepared to give the fox guy another piece of my mind, but I pull up short when I see the guy who’d waved at me the first day I got here.
His eyes are a mystic green that seem to swirl with magic as he watches me. His lips spread into a wide grin, showing off pearly white teeth. He drifts close to me, a chain hanging from his dark jeans. When he stops a foot away from me, my eyes move down to his nails, taking in the black polish covering them.
“Let me guess, you want to take on round three of my anger,” I say to him coldly, preparing myself for another argument.
Just my fucking luck.
But instead of saying that I don’t know who he is or one of those other cheesy lines that seem to be in abundance at this school, he only huffs out a laugh. His eyes twinkle as they roam over me. “I’m not here for an argument. I figured I could escort you to your room, keep you out of trouble since you seem to attract it.”
Mirth dances in his eyes.
“Really? Because something tells me you’re the exact type of trouble I need to avoid.” He gives me the classic bad boy vibes and how could he not with his leather jack, dark features, and crooked smile. He’s shirtless under the jacket, but I refuse to let my eyes really inspect all the smooth, toned skin.
“Me?” he asks, placing a hand to his chest. “I’m about as innocent as they come around here.”
“Why do I doubt that?” I ask even as my shoulders relax.
“Because you’re a smart girl,” he drawls, moving close to me until we’re almost standing chest to chest.
Heat swarms my body as I tilt my head back to look up at him. My breath stutters in my chest as his eyes swirl from green to a near pitch black. The sense to run away overwhelms me but it’s battled by the feel to get even closer to him.
I lean closer to him, my mind obviously made up about which side we want to be on.
He chuckles and I feel him reach up and wrap a lock of my hair around his finger. I watch out of the corner of my eye as he twirls the curly, purple hair. He chuckles as he pulls a piece of spaghetti from the strand.
“So does that mean you’re going to let me escort you to your room, gorgeous?” he asks, raising a brow.
Okay, yeah, definitely trouble.
It feels like I’m broken from a trance as I take a step away from him and yet my heart is still beating rapidly in my chest. The urge to get closer to him is still strong but I choose wisely this time, moving away from him.
“You can walk me,” I tell him. “But if you try any bullshit-”
“You’ll threaten to smack me like the other bitches?” he asks in amusement

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The Atlantic Prison

For my mind I thought that there were plot holes that needed to better thought out – for instance – Nyx/Eos share a body but have different personalities and minds. Nyx is the daytime version and you would a. think that her body would demonstrate what Eos had been up to the previous night – whether she had eaten for instance, drunk alcohol or whatever; b. hen did Nyx actually ever sleep? She needs rest surely and if Eos is out all night and she is awake all day?

And didn’t the sister need to eat – she may not be hungry but not eating or drinking will certainly kill her.

Nyx was gullible – too gullible for someone who was playing at Robin Hood. And how did she know who needed help? All too glibly passed over to get her into the prison with her 3 companions and a ‘fated mate’. The latter being just one too many things for the plot. In my mind. Someone she could connect with perhaps but fated, really?

I just felt that the author had been reading too many shifter/fae stories and had just added all the elements together into a big mixer and come out with this story. Not for me, but young adults may enjoy.

We’re the most dangerous criminals…

heir - The Atlantic Prison

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A World of slavery and …

 

I was given an extract of this book through NetGalley – now I don’t usually bother with extracts, but this one looked intriguing. And it was.
I’ve never read Sarah Maas before, and this is apparently her first venture into writing for an adult rather than YA audience. And for me it worked. I have read some comments where people who have read her YA books thought that this one had faults – yes of course we had Alpha aholes and a kick ass heroine. After all, this is the trope in which this book was written. Nice to see also that the angels weren’t all bright and light and good – plenty of grey and nasties.
I thought it was good universe building – yes we had the MidGard planet and a continent called the Pangera (see Pangea – the real land mass on Earth) and other references to these universes/worlds built in other books in this genre – but still the mix of technology and magic in this one was different.
And I so far haven’t come across a universe where there are angel slaves. Which I thought was a nice touch and permitted new storylines to emerge.
For me, this was a good read – it could have stopped at many points and been a much shorter book and left stuff for the next – but instead Mass carried on with a new twist and more highs and lows. The twists and hidden secrets kept coming right until the end – hints of these secrets only realisable after the action – which is good writing and means good plotting took place.
I liked the extract enough to buy the full book which means I wanted to find out more in the story… so a good read for me. I hope to read the next one in the series and that it is as long and complex in plotting as this one.

I was given an extract of this book through NetGalley – now I don’t usually
bother with extracts, but this one looked intriguing. And it was.

I’ve never read Sarah Maas before, and this is apparently her first venture
into writing for an adult rather than YA audience. And for me it worked. I have
read some comments where people who have read her YA books thought that this
one had faults – yes of course we had Alpha aholes and a kick ass heroine.
After all, this is the trope in which this book was written. Nice to see also that the angels weren’t all bright and light and good – plenty of grey and nasties.

I thought it was good universe building – yes we had the MidGard planet and a continent called the Pangera (see Pangea – the real land mass on Earth) and other references to these universes/worlds built in other books in this genre – but still the mix of technology and magic in this one was different.

And I so far haven’t come across a universe where there are angel slaves.
Which I thought was a nice touch and permitted new storylines to emerge.

For me, this was a good read – it could have stopped at many points and been a much shorter book and left stuff for the next – but instead Maas carried on with a new twist and more highs and lows. The twists and hidden secrets kept coming right until the end – hints of these secrets only realisable after the action – which is good writing and means good plotting took place.

I liked the extract enough to buy the full book which means I wanted to find
out more in the story… so a good read for me. I hope to read the next one in
the series and that it is as long and complex in plotting as this one.

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Fairy Children

The Changelings- My title for this book 
This book taps into the oft repeated stories about fairy changelings. Where the fairies steal a human child & replace them with one of their own. 
Although why the fairies should do this is never explained.
The first time I tried to read this book I found the initial chapters so creepy, I put the book away. This time, I read on.
The story is still creepy but I got hooked. 
I actually lived in Sheffield in 1976, and well remember how dry it was, and now the Rivelin Dams' waters shrunk. I remember The fascination of seeing the drowned villages re-appear and how creepy they looked draped in water weed and crumbling.
This story leaves you with the distinct impression, that there is more to our world than the rational eye can see. Again with the ghost stor.
was the mother suffering from post-partum paranoia? Or was there more?

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Why being Born is important: the author explains

ShadesOfBetrayalTourBanner - Why being Born is important: the author explains

Questions for Authors:

  1. Can you tell your readers something about why you chose this particular topic to write about? What appealed to you about it? Why do you think it is different and your approach is unique?

The Fae Games Series encompasses a number of genres. The duet that started the series is more traditional Fantasy Romance, however, each spin-off evolved into its own story. When I began to write Ashley and Cat’s books, I wanted to be true to their characters rather than write a story that “fit” in the exact same style as the first two books. That makes my series a bit tricky to categorize because the books vary as the series progresses. Cat’s story in Born of Nothing is substantially more emotional than the other books while her love story is more tender and sweeter than Rebecca and Ashley’s. Similarly, the same action-packed adventure would not have befitted Cat as it did the other ladies. I think this makes my books somewhat unusual because most series tend to stick to a certain formula. Fortunately, as an indie author, I have the freedom to dictate my own path, and I love how the series has unfolded.

  • How long do you think about a topic before deciding to write about it? Do you have a set of notes or a note book where you write down topics that appeal before making a decision as to which topic this time? How long does it take to research a topic before you write? And for this book?

I haven’t been at this long, but so far, I tend to focus on one story at a time. I do have a collection of story ideas set aside, but I only delve into an idea once I’ve decided on it as my next project. I thrive on organization. Developing multiple storylines at once sounds entirely too chaotic for my taste. I spend a couple weeks developing a story, then a couple more fleshing out the outline and researching. Born of Nothing came together faster than any of my other books; it practically wrote itself. I had the book fully outlined in about a week! I’ve started outlining the next book, but its plot is more complex, and the outline process is taking substantially more time.

  • Would you recommend self-publishing and building an audience before approaching a publisher? If so, what benefits do you see that it might have for the aspiring novelist? Does writing provide sufficient income to live on? And how long did it take before this happened?

I don’t have any experience with acquiring an agent or traditional publishing, so I can’t speak on that endeavour. However, I’ve quickly become well-versed at self-publishing. What I would tell a new author is to enter publishing like you would any other business—come with start-up capital. There are so many options out there for readers, you will have to spend money to get your work in front of those readers (not to mention production costs). I’ve been extremely fortunate that at six months from publishing my first book, I am covering my expenses—that is to say, I’m breaking even. While money is coming in, it’s not going in my pocket. AMS sponsored product ads are crucial in my experience, and I would recommend keeping your prices low to encourage sales, which boosts your rank (helps your placement in Amazon algorithms). There’s so much involved in publishing, it’s definitely an art in itself.

  • What do you read when you are ill in bed? What is your favourite genre?

I love all things romance. I often quit reading a book if there’s no obvious romantic thread. I’ll read historical, contemporary, new adult, erotica, paranormal… However, I’m not a fan of insta-love or super sweet romance. I love a bad boy, anti-hero and complexity to my characters.

  • What have you done with the things you wrote when in school?

I had no aspirations of writing earlier in life, so I have no secret manuscripts tucked away from school. That would be nice, but no. My parents were stunned when I called to tell them I’d written a book and planned to publish it myself. At 40, I did an about-face and changed careers from university contract attorney to romance author—who would have thought?!

  • Do you have any pets?
    • If so, what are they?
    • And what are they called?
    • Do they help you write?
    • What is the funniest thing they have done while you are writing?
    • Do you want to add a photo of them to this Q&A?

Golden Retriever—Joker

German Shepherd/Poodle mutt—Harley

Siamese cat brothers—Batman and Robin

(pics below and thanks for having me!!)

The picture below is Joker. He’s a giant baby, always in need of attention—he even carries around whatever he can fit in his mouth like an offering. Look what I have brought you, please love me.

dog born - Why being Born is important: the author explains
cat born - Why being Born is important: the author explains

Calico cat—Willow (she’s short so we named her after the movie Willow)

This is Robin, my momma’s boy. He is super affectionate and often interrupts my work for cuddles.

- Why being Born is important: the author explains

Author Details

Jill - Why being Born is important: the author explains

Jill is a Texan, born and raised. She manages the hectic social calendars for her three active children and occasionally spends an evening with her dashing husband. Aside from being an author and a mom, she’s an attorney, travel junkie, and voracious reader.

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18150241.Jill_Ramsowerh

https://twitter.com/JRamsowerr

https://www.facebook.com/jillramsowerauthor/

https://www.jillramsower.com/

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